We are a non-profit association of professional and amateur archaeologists, plus interested citizens of Sarasota and Manatee Counties in Southwest Florida, USA.

TIME SIFTERS ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

DEDICATED TO DISCOVERING AND PRESERVING ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE

Since its inception in 1986, TSAS has assisted archaeologists in major excavations throughout southwest Florida. Members participated in excavations and in creating ‘A Window to the Past’ exhibition inside of a prehistoric shell mound at Historic Spanish Point. Time Sifters has sponsored and/or participated in the successful outreach programs; “Trail of Florida's Indian Heritage” and “Looking for Angola”. Over the decades, TSAS has provided significant support contributing to the preservation of local archaeological resources. TSAS is a chapter of the Florida Anthropological Society, and supports local anthropology programs at New College of Florida, including sponsoring a paper competition for college students.


  NOTES FROM A TIME SIFTER          

OCTOBER PRESENTATION VIDEO

Health consumerism in the modern sense speaks to patients’ involvement in their own healthcare decisions. How does this concept apply to enslaved laborers in the antebellum South? Anthropologist Lori Lee’s study of enslaved African Americans in central Virginia looks at the degree of access they had to resources that shaped their health and well-being experiences. The nature of health and illness is multilayered. It is influenced by an individual’s personal experience with their physical body, including their mind; by how the body is socially represented in various symbolic and metaphorical forms; and by regulation, surveillance, and control of one’s reproduction and sexuality, work and leisure, and sickness. Lee’s presentation uses this multi-layered approach to explore practices of health and healthcare among the enslaved laborers in the antebellum South.

Lori Lee is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Flagler College. Her research focuses on the archaeology of the African diaspora, gender, memory, and material culture.


REMEMBERING THE MANATEE RIVER MAROONS OF 1821: Heritage, Archaeology, and Digital Reconstructions

The history for Angola, an early 19th century maroon community on the Manatee River, is enmeshed with international intrigues, fights and flights for freedom, and reveals an impressive heritage of liberty in southwest Florida. Its … READ FULL ARTICLE

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