Beer & Bullets to Go: Ancient ‘Takeout’ Window Discovered Owen Jarus, LiveScience Contributor

Some 5,200 years ago, in the mountains of western Iran, people may have used takeout windows to get food and weapons, newly presented research suggests. But rather than the greasy hamburgers and fries, it appears the inhabitants of the site ordered up goat, grain and even bullets, among other items.
The find was made at Godin Tepe, an archaeological site that was excavated in the 1960s and 1970s by a team led by T. Cuyler Young Jr., a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada, who died in 2006. A team of researchers took up his work after he died and recently published the results of the excavation, along with more recent research on the artifacts, in the book “On the High Road: The History of Godin Tepe” (Hilary Gopnik and Mitchell Rothman, Mazda Publishers, 2011). In addition a symposium was held recently where the takeout windows, among other research finds at Godin Tepe, were discussed.
The idea that they were used as takeout windows was first proposed by Cuyler Young and is based mainly on their height and location beside the central courtyard.
The windows could have been used by ordinary individuals or perhaps by soldiers “driving through” to grab some food, or even weapons. [See images of the ancient takeout windows]
Odd windows
The research shows that Godin Tepe started out, in prehistoric times, as a simple settlement. “For about 1,000 years the mound of Godin was occupied by a small village of farmers and shepherds,” said Hilary Gopnik of Emory University, at a recent symposium at the Royal Ontario Museum.
That changed quickly. “Sometime in about 3,200 B.C. somebody razed those houses and built this oval enclosure,” Gopnik said. The mud-brick structure had a central courtyard surrounded by buildings, including one particularly prominent structure with two windows

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Http://www.livescience.com/16773-ancient-takeout-window-godin-tepe.htmlPrehistoric Takeout Credit: Courtesy Royal Ontario Museum

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