MAY 2017 PRESENTATION VIDEO

Gradiometers, Copper Plates, & Mounds : A History of the Etowah Site
Presented by Dr. Adam King,
Research Associate Professor, SC Institute of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of South Carolina

The Etowah site is a large town built by Native Americans before the coming of the Europeans in the northern part of the modern state of Georgia. It is a big and impressive place, and it was an important place in the early history of the Deep South. Etowah was a major center in the Mississippian civilization that flourished from as early as 1000 CE to as late as 1600 CE. This forgotten Native American civilization is responsible for large cities, great monuments, and elaborate works of art, just like other civilizations of the world. Etowah’s history was complex and included multi-ethnic beginnings, an unexplained abandonment, the arrival of foreigners, attacks by invaders, and even a visit by early Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. In this presentation, Dr. King discusses what traditional archaeology, remote sensing, and iconographic studies have revealed about the site and the people who built it. Dr. Adam King, Research Associate Professor in the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of South Carolina, focuses his research on the early history of Native Americans, particularly during the Mississippian Period (AD1000-1600).

APRIL 2017 PRESENTATION VIDEO – Dating Game: Palmer Mound Pots & People

The Dating Game: Palmer Mound Pots & People
By Maranda Kles, Ph.D.,  Assistant Professor, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

The Palmer mound site is located at Historic Spanish Point in south Sarasota County. Recent research has provided new radiocarbon dates for the mound and has also examined social structure, shedding new light on the people that inhabited the Sarasota area 2000 years ago. Biological distance analysis suggests that the population was matrilocal, therefore the men moved to the area to “date” and marry their wives. This pattern has yet to be demonstrated at other sites in Florida making Palmer unique at this time. Further, several whole pots were found broken within the mound. These pots are found in the Manasota period strata, which dates to before the usual “sacrificed” or “killed” pots that are found in many of the Weeden Island period sites. This presentation will detail the new radiocarbon and biological data and discuss the implication of pots and pottery at the Palmer site. Maranda Kles is a bioarchaeologist and forensic anthropologist. She was born is Sarasota and earned her PhD from the University of Florida. She is an assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Her research interests focus on biological and cultural variation in pre-Contact populations in the Southeastern US.